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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 330



lave taken upon yea to wear my arms?* 9 It Is yoit %rho have mine/ replied Chandos ; € for it is a* much pine as yonrs/ € I deny that/ faid the lonj pf Clermont € and were it not for the truce be-* tw^en us, I would foon fhew you that you ha,ve no right to wear it.* r Ha/ anfweredfir John Chandos, . ' you will find me to-morrow in the field, ready prepared to defend, arid to prove by force of arms, that it is as much mine as yours/ The lord of Clermont replied ; € Thefe are the !oaftings of you Englifh, who can invent nothing new, but take for your own whatever you fee hand' ibme belonging to others/ With that they parted, ' without more words, and each returned to his own fcrmy, • • The cardinal de Perigord, not being fible by any means to reconcile the king and prince* returned to Poitiers late in the evening. That lame day the French kept in their quarters, where they lived at their eafe, having plenty of provifions ; whilft the Englifh, on the other hand, were but b^dly off, nor did they know whither ter go for forage, as they were fo ftraitly kept by the JFrench, they could not move withput danger. This Sunday they made many mounds and ditches round where the archers were polled, the better to fecure thçm. On Monday morning, the prince and his army were foon in readinefs, and as well arrayed as oi\ the former day. The French were alfo drawn out by fun-rife. The cardinal, .returning again that rnorning, imagined ' that, by his exhortations, he couli\ 315 «


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