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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 339



St. George, fêr Guienne ! 9 and fir John Chandos faid to the prince ; € Sir, fir, now pufii forward, for the days is ours : God will this day put it in your hand. Let us make for our adveffary the king of France ; for where he is will lie the main ftrefs of the bufinefs : I well know that his valour will not let him fly; and he will remain with us, if it pleafe God and St. George: but he mull be well fought with ; and you have before faid, that you would Ihew yourfelf this day a good knight/ The prince replied ; € John, get forward ; you Jhall not fee me % urn my back this day, but I will always be among the foremofl/ He then faid to fir Walter Wood-land, his banner-bearer,. Banner advance, in the name of God and St. George/ ' The kni&ht obeyed the commands of the prince. In that part, the battle was very hot, and greatly crowded : many a one was unhorfed : and you muft know, that when* ever any one fell, he could not get up again, unlefs he were quickly and well aflifted.. ' As the prince was thus'advancing upon his ene-mies, followed by his divifion, and upon the point of charging them, he perceived the lord Robert de Duras lying dead near a fmall bulh on his right hand, with his banner befide him, and ten or twelve of his people ; upon which he ordered two of his fquires and three archers to place the body upon a Ihield, carry it to Poitiers, and prefent it from him to the cardinal of Perigord, and fay, that '1 falute bin* by thftt token/ This was done; for he bad been kformed how the fuite of the cardinal had re- . . " • mained 324


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