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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 344



The lord Douglas*, from Scotland, ifa» alfo m the king's battalion, and for fome time fought very valiantly ; but, when he perceived the difcomfiture was * * Lord Douglas, forgetful of bis religious pilgrimage, offered bis fword to the French king. He was received with diftinguiflied honours, * was made a "knight of his hande/ Scala Chron. ®p0 Leland, and his ièrvice was accepted. To fay that a perfon re-ceived the honour of knighthood, is, in modern language, unin-terefrJng, and fometimes it is ludicrous. This muft always be the cafe, wheu names and ceremonies are retained, while from a total change of manuers, that which gave dignity to fuch names and ceremonies is forgotten by the vulgar. * Great carnage was ' made of the Scots at the battle of Poitiers. Lord Douglas, after having been wounded, was forced off the field by his furviving companions. Archibald Douglas, a warrior eminent in our hiftory, fell into the power of the enemy ; but, by the extraordinary prefence of mind of fir William Ramiky of Golluthy, he was concealed, and efcaped unknown. * The ftory of Archibald Douglas's efcape, as related by Forduo, is curious. It (hail be, translated as nearly as poffible in his own manner. ' Archibald Douglas, having been made prifoner along with the reft, appeared in more fumptuous armour than the other Scottilh prifoners ; and, therefore, he was fuppofed by the Eoglifh to be fome great lord. Late in the evening after the battle, when the Engliih were about to ftrip off his armonr, fir William Ramfay of Coiluthy, happening to be prefent, fixed his eyes on Archibald Douglas, and, affe&iug to be in a violent paffion, cried out* You cursed, damnable murderer, how comes it, in the name of mis» chief (ex parte diafcoli), that you are thus proudly decked out in your master's armour ? Come hither, and pull off my boots, Douglas approached trembling, kneeled down, and pulled off one of the boots. Ramfay, taking up the boot, beat Douglas witb it* The Engliih byeftanders, imagining him out of his fenfes, -m


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