Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 408



had united themfelves with thofe of Valois, and were on their road thither. On the other hand, thofe of Paris had alfo been informed of the treafures Meaux contained, and had fet out fram that place in crowds : having met the others, they amounted together to nine thou-fand men : their forces were augmenting every Hep they advanced. They came to the gates of the town, which the inhabitants opened to them, and allowed them to enter : they did fo in fuch numbers that all the ftreets were quite filled, as far as the market-place, which is tolerably ftrong, but it required to be guarded, though the river Marne nearly furrounds it. The noble dames #ho were lodged there, fee-ing fuch multitudes rufiiing towards them, were exceedingly frightened. On this, the two lords and their company advanced to the gate of the market-place, which they had opened, and march-ing under the banners of the earl of Foix and dukt of Orleans, and the pennon of the captai of Buch, pofted themfelves in front of this peafantry, who were badly armed. When thefe banditti perceived fuch a troop of gentlemen, fo well equipped, fally forth to guard the market-place, the foreraoft of them began to fall back. The gentlemen then followed them, ufing their lances and fwords. When they felt the weight of fheir blows, they, through fear, turned about fo faft, they fell one over the other. All manner of armed perfons then rulhed out of the barriers, drove them before them, ftriking them down 393 . '


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика