Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.2
page 412



ê Firft, for the death of thé two marfhals and mailer Simon de Buci ; alfo for the infult which the provoft of the merchants had offered to him in his own palace at Paris, which he fwore had been 4one without his knowledge. He promifed the duke to remain with him at ail events, during this expedition. ' Upon this peace was made between them. The king of Navarre added, that he would have the Parifians corrected for the evil deeds they had committed. ' • ' The commonalty were to be included in this peace ; but the duke was to have the provoft of the merchants delivered up to him, and twelve of the citizens, according to his choice, to punifli in what manner he (hould think beft. Thefe things being fettled, the king of Navarre returned to St. Denis, and the duke went to M eaux in Brie, where he difmiffed his army. Some of the citizens of Paris, to whom the treaty had given more freedom to fpeak their minds, in-treated the duke to return to Paris, in all fecurity, and that they would pay him every honour in their power. The duke anfwered, € that he fhould confider the peace as good, having fworn to it; that it lhould never, with God's permiflion, be infringed by him ; but that he would never again enter Paris, untefo he had fatisfaéiion from thofe who had infulted him/ The provoft of the merchants, and thofe of his fa&ion, frequently vifited the king of Navarre at St. Denis: they remonftrated with him on the indigna-tion


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика