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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 20



Sir Galahaut was always eager for any warikç enterprife, and, finding himfelf thus courteoufly ibught after by his neighbours of Peronne, readily complied with their requeft, and anfwered, that he would fet out and be with them the day after the morrow. He left ïournay with about thirty lances ; but his numbers., as he rode on, increafed. He fent to fir Roger de Coulongne, to meet him àt an ap-pointed place, which fir Roger did, accompanied by nineteen good companions, fo that fir Galahaut had now fifty lances. They took up their quarters one night, in their - way to Peronne, within two fhort leagues of the enemy, at a village, but where they found no one, for all the inhabitants of the low countries had fled to the fortified towns. On the next morning, they were to have got? inta Peronne, as they were but a fmalt diftançe from it* About the hour of midnight, when fupper was over, after they had pofted their watch, they were chat-ting and jefting about feats of arms, of which they had wherewithal to talk, fir Galahaut faid ; 1 We fhall get into Peronne very early to-morrow morn-ing ; but, before we make our entry there, I would propofe an excurfion towards the flanks of our enemies ; for I fhall be much miftaken, if there will not be fome of them who will fet out early in hopes of gaining honor or booty by pillaging the country ; and we may perchance meet with them, and make them pay our fcore.' His companions immediately agreed to this propofal, kept it fecret among them-felves, and were ready with their horfes faddled at "break of day. They took the field in good order, and, 6


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