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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 55



duded, though it was " difcuffed for a long time. The king of England kept advancing into the coun-try, feeking for thofe parts where was the greateft abundance. The commiffioners, like wife men, never quitted the king, nor fuffered their propofals to drop ; for they faw the kingdom in fuch a mi-ferable fituation, that the greateft danger was to be apprehended if they fhould fuffer another fummer to pafs without peace. On the other hand, the king of England infilled on fuch conditions as would have been fo very grievous and prejudicial to France, that the com-miffioners, in honor, could not «fient to them: fo that their treaties and conferences lafted feventeen days, the two prelates and the lord of Autun con-ftantly following the king • of England : this laft was much liftened to at the court of the king* They fent every day, or every other day, their trea-ties and minutes to the duke of Normandy and his brothers at Paris, that they might fee what ftate they were in, and have anfwers thereto ; as well as to know in what manner they, were to a&. All thefe papers were attentively examined, and con-fidered privately, in the apartments of the duke of Normandy, and then the full intentions of the duke were written down, with the opinions of his council to thefe commiffioners : by which means, nothing pafied on either fide without being fully fpecified and examined moft cautioufly. ' Thefe aforefaid Frenchmen were in the king's apartments, or in his lodgings, as it happened, in the different places fie halted at, as well on his march toward? Chartres as ' 4^


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