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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 169



Rrixeé themfelves with the Englifh arid Navarrois, as did the Englifh with them, equally e^ger in the pombat. There was much hacking and cutting of each other, with lances and battle-axes, feizing each other by main ftrength and wreftlhig. They took and ranfomed prifoners from each alternately, and were fo much intermixed together, that they engaged man to man, and behaved with a degree of valoujr fcarcely to be credited but by eye-witneffes. You may eafily imagine that in fuclua crowd,and fo fituated, numbers were thrown down, wounded and killed: for neither fide fpared the other. The French h^d need not to fleep on their bridles ; for they had oppofed to them men of ability and de-termined, enterprife. Each, therefore, loyally agreed, not only to defend himfelf and his port vigoroufly, but to take every advantage that fhould offer : if they had not done fo, they muft have been defeated. In truth, I muft fay, that the Bretons and Gafcons were good men, and performed many gallant feats of arms. I wifh now to fpeak of the thirty who liad been feleûed to attack the captai. They had been ex» cellently mounted, on the beft horfes of the army, and attentive to nothing but their orders (as, being fo charged, they were bound to do) : they advanced in a ciofe body towards the captai, who was ufing Ms battle-axe manfully, and gave fuch deadly ftrokes with it that none dared approach him. They pulled through the crowd by the ftrength of their horfes,


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