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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 197



till lie would ardor fome other to that Gomnafid ; for, in fad, he was anxious to enter the battle with the firft. Thi» conduit nearly brought tears to the eyes of fir John. He again addreiTed him, gently faying ; * Sir Hugh, it is absolutely necefiary that either you or I take this command : now, ccwfidef which can be moft fpared/ Sir Hugh, having confidered this kft fpeech, was much confuted, and replied; 4 Certainly, fir, I know full well that you would afk nothing from me which could turn out to my dishonour ; and, fince it is fo, I will very cheerfully undertake it/ Sir Hugh Caverly then took the command of the battalion called the rear-guard, entered the field in the rear, on the wing of the ethers, and. formed his ine. It was on Saturday the 8th day of Oâober, 1364» that thefe battalions •were drawn up facing each other, in a handfome plain, near to Auray in Brit* tany. I muft fay, it was a fine thing to fee and re-flect on ; for there were banners and pennons ly-ing, with the richeft armour on each fide: the French were fo handfomely and grandly drawn up, it was great pleafure to look at them. Whilft either party was forming or dividing its battalions, the lord of Beaumanoir, a very great and rich baron of Brittany, was going to and from each army, with propofitions for peace. Very willingly would he have laboured, if he had been able, to ward off the perils that were on the point of hap-pening. He was earaeft in the bufine& : and the N4 Englifh i»3


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