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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 203



but their arrows hurt not, as the French were tod well armed and fiiielded from them. Upon this, they flung away their bows ; and, being light and able men, they mixed with the men at arms of their party, and attacked thofe of the French who had battle-axes. Being men of addrefs and courage, they immediately feized feveral of thefe axes, with which they afterwards fought valiantly and fuc-cefsfully. » • There were many gallant feats of arms perform-ed ; many a ftruggle, many a capture and many a refcue. You muft know, that whoever had the misfortune to fall, found great difficulty to rife again, unlefs he was fpeedily fuccoured. The battalion of lord Charles marched ftraight to that of lord John de Montfort, which was very ftrong and deep. In his company were, the vi£ count de Rohan, the lords de Léon, Charles de Dinan, de Quintin, d'Ancénis and de Rochefort, each with his banner difplayed before him. The engagement between thefe two battalions was very fevere and defperate, and well fought on both fides. That of the earl of Montfort was at firft thrown into confufion ; but fir Hugh Gaveriy, who was upon its wing with a good battalion of gallant men, perceiving them giving way and opening their ranks, drove the enemy back, and replaced every thing by force of arms. This a&ioft was certainly of great ufe to them. In another'part of the plain, fir Olivier de Clifibn, fir Euftace d Ambreticourt, fir Matthew Gournay, and feveral other valiant knights and fquires, fought valo- 189


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