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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 269



pleafed, and faid that all their menaces would not make him change his mind. Upon his return, he told the companions all that had paffed, as well as the meflage he was to deliver to them. The leaders, on hearing it, were not much fatisfied} for they Were unequal 1 in numbers to the French, fo that they kept themfelves on their guard as much as they could. Now it chanced, that exaÔly five days after this converfation, fir Perducas d'Albret with a large body of companions were on their march to pafs through Montauban, for that was the direft road into the principality. He fent information of it to the governor : which when fir Robert Cheney and the other companions who had fliut themfelves up in the town heard, they were mightily rejoiced* They fecretly made fir Perducas acquainted with the arrival of the French, and how they kept them befieged, threatening them much : they alfo inform* ed him of the numbers of the French, with the names'of their commanders. When fir Perducas learnt this, he was no way frightened, but, colle&ing his men in a body, galloped into Montauban, where he was joyfully re* ceived. Upon their arrival, they difcuffed among themfelves, what would be moft advifabie to do : they unanimoufly refolved, that on the morrow they would ami, iflfue out of the town, and addrefs themfelves to the French, to requeft they would allow them peaceably to pafs on. If they would not agree to this, and it wefe abfolutely neceflary to - fight,


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