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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 283



offers, and for having come to vifit them. He af-terwards gave Mm in charge the government of the country, and defired that, during his abfence, he would be attentive to guard it. The earl very wil-lingly accepted this charge : having taken his leave of the prince and the duke, he returned to his home. • The prince, however, remained at Dax, with his army, which was fpread all over the coun-try, as far as the entrance of the defiles which lead to Navarre ; for they were uncertain if they could pafs through them or not, or if the king of Navarre would lay open his country to them, according tq his treaty. It had been currently reported, that he had en-tered into new conventions with king Henry, which had much aftoniihed the prince a^nd his council, and made don Pedro very melancholy. Whilft thefe reports were believed, and during the ftay at Dax, fir Hugh Calverley and his men entered Navarre, and took the city of Miranda and the town of Puenta delia Reyna, which alarmed the whole country, fo that information was immediately fent of it to the king of Navarre. Upon hearing that the companies were forcibly entering his kingdom, he was much enraged, and wrote to the prince, who made very light of it, be-cayfe he thought the king of Navarre did not per-form the articles of his treaty with don Pedro : he therefore wrote back to him, to come himfelf, or to fend fome perfon to explain thofe things which were laid to his charge, as it was publicly reported he had changed fides, and had joined king Henry. When. 269


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