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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 306



numbers as the Spaniards were, comforted them-felves the beft they could, and, advancing into the plain, took poffeflion c nail eminence, where -$hey drew up in order of battle. The Spaniards marched towards them, and halted to confider what would be the moft advantageous manner of fighting them. Sir William Felton that day performed a moft brilliant a&ion : defcending the hill full gallop, with his lance in its reft, he dafhed into the midft of the Spaniards, when meeting a Spanifh knight, he drove his fpear with fuch force, it pafled through his armour, body and all, and threw him dead an the ground. . Sir William was furrounded on all fides ; but he fought as manfully as any knight could have done, and did them much mifchief before they were able to bring him down. His brother and the other knights were witneffes, from the eminenc^ of his valour, and the gallant a&s he was doing, as well as the peril he was in; but it was out of their power to affift him, without running every rifle themfelves. They remained, therefore, fteadily upon the mountain in order of battle. The knight fought as long as his ftrength lafted, but in the end was unfortunately flain. The French and Spaniards, after this, began to attack the Englifh, and to endeavour to take them that had drawn themfelves up on the hill. That day, many good a&ions were done. At one time, they made a general attack, and - defcended in a body upon their enemies ; and then, wheeling fud- denly 2$2


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