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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 310



fidenoe m the power of God and of my men/ Thus ended this converfation : wine and fpices were brought in by fome knights, of which the king and the lords prefent partook § and then they all retired to their quarters. The knights and fquires who had that day been made prifoners, gave their oaths as fuch, and were put under the care of different knights. We will return to the prince, to fpeak of his ar« rangements.. He arid the duke of Lancafter had remained in the pofition they had taken in the morning, until about vefpers, when they were in* formed that their advanced detachment had been all taken or killed ; at which they were much vexed, but they could not then amend it. They retired to their quarters, where they remained that night. On the morrow morning, they called a council, and determined to leave their prefent pofition, to advance more into the country. They decamped^ and took up their quarters nearer to Vittoria, marching full armed, as if immediately to encage ; for they had heard that king Henry and his broi thers, with their army, were not far diftant : how, ever they made no advances to meet them. You muft know, the prince and his brother were in great want of provifion for themfèlves and their horfes, as they had entered a very barren country^ whilft king Henry and his army enjoyed a quite contrary fituation. A loaf of bread, and of no great fize, was fold in the prince's army for a florin 1 . and many were very eager to pay this price when-ever they werç able to get it. The weather was* tie 296


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