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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 315



as they had difmounted, the prince fent his fcouts, to obferve the countenance of the enemy and where they lay, Thefe fcouts, being mounted on the be|t of horfes, left the army, and advanced until they faw the whole of the Spanifh force encamped upon the heaths beyond Navarete : they inftantly inform-ed the prince of this, who was very glad to hear it* Towards evening, he gave out fecret orders for the army to hold itfelf in readinefs at the firft found of his trumpet*; that at the fécond found it fhould arm, and on the third mount, and immediately fol-low the banners of the marfhals and the pennon of St. George ; and that no one, under pain of death fhould break his rank, without being ordered fo to do. King Henry had done exa&ly as the prince of Wales, and had fent out his fcouts on this Friday evening, to learn the condition of the prince's army, what appearance they made, and where they were quartered. Thofe fent brought back true intelli-gence : upon hearing it, the king and fir Bertrand held a confutation on the fubjeâ. They made their men fup and go to bed very early, that they might be more frefh and hearty by midnight, when they were commanded to make themfeives ready, arm, and take the field in battle-array ; for they well knew that a battle muft enfue on the morrow. The Spaniards, therefore, made t themfeives merry, for they had wherewithal largely to do fo : but the Englifh were in the greateft want of provifion j for which reafon, they were anxious to fight. Tht Soi


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