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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 318



P4 • «lefccnding this hill, he extended his Ene of battle in the plain, and then halted. The Spaniards, feeing the Englifh had baited* did the fame, in order of battle : then each man tightened his armour, and made ready as for inftant combat. Sir John Chandos advanced in front of the bat-talions with his banner uncafed in his hand* He prefented it to the prince, faying, 4 My lord, hero is my banner : I prefent it to you, that I may dif-play it in whatever manner fhall be moft agreeable to you j for, thanks to God, I have now fufficient lands to enable me fo to do, and maintain the rank which it ought to hold/ The prince, don Pedro being prefent, took the banner in his hands, which was blazoned with a fliarp ftake gules on a field argent ; after having cut off the tail to make it fquare, he difplayed it, and, returning it to him by the handle, faid j c Sir John, I return you your banner. God give you ftrength and honor to preferve it/ Upon this, fir John left the prince, went back to his men with the banner in his band, and faid to them ; c Gentlemen, behold my banner and yours ; you will therefore guard it as it becomes you/ His companions, taking the banner, replied with much cheerfiilnefs, that € if it pleafed God and St. George, they would defend it well, and aft worthily of it, to the utmoft of their abilities/ . • The banner was put into the hands of a worthy Englifh fquire, called William Alleftry, who bore it with


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