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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 329



tage of a favorable opportunity, if k had not beet* for tjigir love of the king* After the defeat of the battalion of fir1 Bertrand du Guefclin and the marfhal d'Afldreghcii* when at! the divifions of the prince were formed ifOo one large body, the Spaniards could no longer keep their ground, but began to fly in great diforder, much frightened, toward* the town of Najara *, and to crofs the river.which runs by it: m fpite of every thing king Henry could fay, they would not rally; nor return to the fight. . When king Henry perceived that his amy was totally defeated, without hopes of recovery, he called for his horfe, mounted it, and galloped among the crowd of runaways, but was careful not to take the road either to'Najara or to the river; for he wifhed not to be furrpunded ; he followed another road, to avoid every danger ; in which he a&ed wifely, as he was fully aware, that if. he fhould be made prifoner, he would be flain without mercy. The Englifh and Gafcons now mounted their horfes, and went in purftiit of the Spaniards; who were flying in difipay, as far as Najara* There was much daughter md effufion of blood at the entrance * D« Sauvage will have It Navarete ; but I think it mufl be Najara, for they would never run away towards Navarete, but on the contrary towards their own homes. The battle was fought between Najara and Navarete. A river runs by Najara, none by Navarete. The Ebro is not far datant ; but, If they had croffed that river, there would have been mention made of Logrono j and beCde*, th.ey would then have been in an enemy's country. of 5«5


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