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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 351



We will now relate how fir Bettrafcd M Guef* tin obtained Ms liberty. After the prince was ret tunned to Acquitaine, his broiler the duke of Lao* fcafter to England, and all the other barons to their different hontes, iîr Bertrand du Guefclin remained prifoner to the prince and to fir John Chandos ; for he could not by any means obtain his ranfom ; which was highly difpleafing to king Henry, but -he could not remedy it. . Now it happened (as I have been informed) that one day, when the prince was in great good humour, he called fir Bertrand du Guefclin, and aflced him how he was. * My lord/ replied fir Bertrand, 4 I Was never better : I cannot otherwife but be well, for 1 am, though in prifon, the moft honored knight * in the world.' * How fo ?' - rejoined the prince* • * They fay in France,' anfwered fir Bertrand, c as well as in other countries, that you are fo much afraid of me, and have fuch a dread of my gaining my liberty, that you dare not fet me free § and this ismyreâfon for thinking myfelf fo much valued and honored.* The prince, on hearing thefe wordsi thought fir Bertrand had fpoken them with much good fenfe ; for, in truth, his council were unwilling-he fhould have his liberty, until don Pedro had paid to the prince and his army the money he had en* gaged to do : he anfwered, * What, fir Bertrand, do you imagine that We keep you a prifoner for fear of your prowefs ? By St. George, it is not fo; for, my good fir, if you will pay one hundred thoufand francs, you fhall be free.* Sir Bertrand was anxious for his liberty, and now, having heard upon what . tçfms he could obtain it, taking the prince at his VOL. III. Z word, m


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