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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 357



barons and knights, to whom it belonged to fpeak more deliberately on this demand than had hitherto been done/ The prince of Wales and his council not being able to gain, more at this time, the par-liament broke up at Niort, and each perfon return-ed to his own home j but they were commanded by the prince to return again by a certain day, which had been fixed upon before they broke up. Thefe lords and barons of Gafcony being arrived in their own country, and having their opinions ftrengthened, were refolved neither to return again to the parliament of the prince nor to fuffer this tax to be impofed upon their lands, even fhould they be obliged to oppofe force in preventing it. • Thip this country began its rebellion againft the prince. . The lords of Armagnac, d'Albret, de Comminges, the earl of Perigord, and feveral great prelates, barons, knights and fquires of Gafconyt went to France, to lay their complaints before the court of the king of France (the king and his peers being prefent) of the wrongs the prince was about to do them. They faid, they were under the jurif-dittion of the king of France, and that they were bound to return to him as to their fovereign lord. . The king of France, who was defirous not openly to infringe the peace between the king of England and him, diffembled his joy ?t thefe words, and re-plied in a guarded manner to the barons of Gafcony, frying ; * Certainly, my lords, we fhall always be very anxious to preferve and even augment the jurifdi&ion of oyr inheritance and of thç crown of France ; but we have fworn, p our father had done, {o feyejal articles of the peace, all of which we do Z 4 not 343


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