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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 370



• ^ 3JÔ much alarmed him and his companions. They were fo ftriftly watched that a bird could not efcape from the 'caille without being noticed. Don Pedro was in great anguifli of heart at fee-#ig himfelf thus furrounded By his enemies, well knowing that they would not enter into any treaty of peace or agreement with him ; fo that confider-ing his dangerous fituation, and the great want of provilion in the caftle, he was advifed to attempt an efcape with his eleven companions about midnight, and to put himfelf under the prôteÛion of God : he was offered guides thai would conduct him to a place of faffety. They remained in the caftle, with this determi-nation, until midnight, when don Pedro, accom-panied by don Fernando de Caftro and others of the eleven companions, fet out. It was very dark. At this hour, the bègue de Villaines had the com-mand of the watch, with upwards of three hundred men. ' Don Pedro had quitted the caftle with his com-panions, and was defcending by an upper path, but fo quietly that it did not appear as if any one was moving : however, thé bègue de Villaines, who had many fufpicions, and was afraid of lofing the objed of his watch, imagined he heard the found of horfes' feet upon the caufeway : he therefore fai^ to thofe near him : Gentlemen, keep quiet : make no movement : for, I hear the fteps of fome people. We muft know who they are, and what they feek at. fuch an hour. I fufpeft they are victuallers, who are bringing provifion to the caftle$ for I know it


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