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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.3
page 456



be flain, the town burnt without mercy ; and that, weighing the bad and good, they advifed opening an immediate treaty with the Englifh. This was foon concluded. They declared, that from that day forward, they would be true to the Englifh, which they afterward folemnly fwore to obferve. They were alfo obliged to fupply the army with fifty horfe-Ioad of provifions from the town, during the fpace of fifteen days, which were to be paid for at a certain fixed price: and thus Roquemadour. obtain* ed peace. ' , The Englifh continued their march, towards Vil-lefiranche, in the Touloufain, burning and deftroy- " ifig the flat countries, bringing great calamines on the poor inhabitants, and conquering iuch towns and caftles as had changed fides ; fome by treaty, others by force. They came at length before Vil-lefranche, which was tolerably well inclofed, and provided with provifion and artillery ; for all thofe of the furrounding flat country had retired into it* They commenced the attack, on their arrival, with much intrepidity. During the four days they lay before it, frequent were the affaults, and many were killed on both fides. The garrifon, having reflect-ed on their fituation, found they could not hold but much longer, and, as there was no appearance of help coming to them, they furrendered to the En-glifh, on condition that neither themfelves nor their town fhould receive any harm. In this manner did Villeffanche, on the borders of Touloufe, become Englifh ; which when told to the duke of Anjou, who was at Touloufe, grieved him much.. Sir John 6 Chandos 442


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