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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 26



It will readily be believed that the earl of Pem-broke and thofe who were thus blockaded were not much at their eafe : they were aware that this houfe was not 'of fufficient ftrength to hold out long againft fo many men at arms. It was as badly provided with artillery, to their great fbrrow, as with provifion i but this laft was not of much confequence, for they could well faft a day and night, if neceffary, in defending themfelves. When it was dark, they entreated a fquire, an expert foldier, and in whom they placed great confidence, to fee out direftly by a poftern, and ride as faft as he could to Poitiers, to inform fir John Chandos and his friends how awkwardly they were fituated, and to beg they would come to their afiiftance j in the hopes of which they would hold out until noon ; and, if he made hafte, he might eafily make this journey by early morning. The fquire, who perceived the extreme danger in which all the lords were, very cheerfully under-took it, but boaftcd a little too much of his know-ledge of the roads. He fet out about, midnight by a poftern-gate, and took the ftraight road, as he thought for Poitiers ; but it fo fell out, that during the whole night he wandered about, until it was broad day, before he hit. upon the right road. At day-break, the French, who were befiçging the Englifh at Puirenon as you have before heard, founded their trumpets to arm, faying it would be better to make their attacks in the cool of. the morning than in the heat of the day. The H


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