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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 48



find francs, remembered this fo forely that, having a great defire to recover his lofles, he fet out on the point of day from the duke's army, accompanied by only twenty men. As he was well acquainted with alLthe roads and pafles of that country, having refided there for upwards of three years, he in-tended lying in ambufcade between Abbeville and the caftle of Rouvray, in the hope of taking fome prize: he had crofled a fmall rivulet which ran through a rnarfh, and hid himfclf and men in fome old uninhabited houfes. Sir Hugh never dreamed that the Englifli would form an ambufcade fo near the town.- Sir Nicolas and his men kept themfelves very quiet: they per-ceived fir Hugh de Chaftillon riding down the road which leads to Rouvray, with only twelve others, armed at all points, except his helmet, which one ©f his pages bore on a courfer behind him. He crofied the little rivulet, and made for the gate of Rouvray to fee what the guard of crofs-bowmcn were about, and to enquire if they had heard or fèen the Englifh* When fir Nicholas Louvaine, who was on the watch, faw him, he recognifed hin dire&ly, and was more rejoiced than if any one had given him twenty thoufand francs. He fallied out from hrs ambufh, faying i c Follow me : here is what I wifhed for : it is the matter of the crofs-bows, t^nd I afk for nothing better/ Then flicking fpurs into his horfe, and pointing tys lance, he came upon fir Hugh, crying, s Surrender, Chaftillon, ct thou art a dead man/ Sir Hugh, who was. much 86


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