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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 55



Whilft the French and Bretons were confidcr-ing the moft advantageous manner to begin the onfet, fir John Chandos arrives with his company^ his banner difplayed and flying in the wind. This was borne by a valiant man at arms, called James Allen, and was a pile gules on a field ar-gent. They might be about forty lances, who eagerly battened to meet the French. As the Englifli arrived at a fmall hillock, about three furlongs from the bridge, the French fervants, who were between this hillock and the bridge,, faw them, and, being much frightened, faid, f Come away : let us fave ourfelves and our horfes.1 They therefore ran off, leaving their matters to fhift as well as they could. When fir John Chandos, with difplayed banner was come up to the French, whom he thought very lighdy of, he began from horfeback to rail at them, faying ; c Do you hear, Frenchmen : you arc mifchievous men at arms : you make in-curfions night and day at your pleafure : you take towns and catties in Poitou, of which I am fénéf-chal. You ranfom poor people without my leave, as if the country were your own j but, by God, it is not. Sir Louis, fir Louis, you and Carnet are too much the matters. It is upwards of a year and a half that I have been endeavouring to meet you. Now, ' thanks to God, I do fo, and will tell you my mind. We will now try which of us is the ftrongeft in this country. It has been often told me, that you were very defirous of feeing me : you have now that pleafure. I am* , John 4*


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