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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 57



ground, blazoned with his arms on white farcenet, argent a pile gtiles ; one on his breaft, and the other on his back ; fo that he appeared refolved on fome adventurous undertaking j and in this ft*e, with fword in hand, he advanced on foot towards the enemy. v This morning there had been a hoar froft, which had made the gtound flippery ; fo that* as he marched he çntangled his legs with his robe, which was of the longeft, and made a ftumble': during which time a fquire, called James de St, Martin (a ftrong expert man), made a thruft at him yfhh his lance, which hit him in the face, below the eye, between the nofe and forehead, Sir John Chandos did not fee the aim of the ftroke, for he had loft the eye on that fide five years ago, on the heaths of Bourdeaux, at the chace of a ftag : what added to this misfortune, fir John had not put down his vizor, fo that in ftumbling he bore upon1 the lance, and helped it to enter into him. The lance, which had been* ftruck from a ftrong arm, hit him fo feverely that it entered as far as the brain, and then the fquire drew it back to him again. The great pain was too much for fir John, fo he fell to the ground, and turned twice over in great agony, like one who had received his death wound. Indeed, fince the blow, he never uttered a word. His people, on feeing this mifhap, were like madmen. His uncle, fir Edward Clifford, haftily advanced, and finding over the body, (for the French were endeavouring to get poffef- fion 45


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