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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 58



fion of It), defended it moft valiandy, and gave fuch well direfted blows with his fword that none dared to approach him. Two other knights, namely fir John Çhambo and fir Bertrand de Ca£ Jîlîcs*, were like men diftra&ed at feeing their mafter lie thus on the ground. The Bretons, who were more numerous than the Englifh, were much rejoiced when they fair their chief thus prottratç, and greatly hoped he was mortally wounded. They therefore advanced, crying out,€ By God, my lords of England, you; will all flay with us, for you cannot now efcape/ The Englifh performed wonderful feats of arms* as well to extricate themfelves from the danger they were in as to revenge their commander, fir-John Chandos, whom they faw in fo piteous a ftate. A fquire attached to fir John marked out this James de St. Martin, ' who had given. the blow : he fell upon him in fuch a rage, and ftruck him with his lance as he was flying, that he ran him . through both his thighs, and then withdrew his lance : however, in fpite of this, James dc St. Martin continued the fight. . Now if lord Thomas Percy, who had firft ar-rived at the bridge, had imagined any thing of what was going forwards, fir John Chandos* men, would have been confiderably reinforced -, but it was otherwife decreed : for, not hearing any thing-of the Bretons fince he had feen them advancing * Sir John Chambo,—fir John Caffilies. Barnes calls the lait Cafe. in, 46


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