Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 59



in a large body towards the bridge, he thought they might have retreated; fo that lord Thomas and his men continued their march, keeping the road to Poitiers, ignorant of what was paffing. Though the Englifh ^ fought fo bravely at the bridge of LufTac, in the end they could not with-ftand the force of the Bretons and French, but were defeated, and the greater part made prifoners-Sir Edward Clifford flood firm, and would not quit the body of his nephew. If the French had had their horfes, • they would have gone off with honour, and have carried with -them good prifoners ; but, as I have before faid, their fervants had gone away with them.. Thofe of the EngWh alfo had retreated, and quitted the fcene of battle. They remained therefore in bad plight, which forely vexed them, and faid among' themfelves,4 This is a bad piece of bufincfs : the field is our own, and yet we cannot return through the fault of our fervants. It is not proper for us who are armed and fatigued to march through this country on foot, which is quite againft us ; and we are upwards of fix leagues from the neareft of i* of our fortreflfes. We have, befides our wounaeci and fiain, whom we cannot leave behind. As they were in this fituation, not knowing what to do, and had fent off two or three of the Bretons, difarmed, to hunt after and endeavour to find their fervants, they perceived advancing to-wards them, fir GuifcarJ d'Angle» fir Louis de Harcourt, the lords de Partenay, de Tannay-bouton, d'Argenton, de Pinane, fir James de Surgeres, 4? .


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика