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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 154



iSght laftcd full three hours : rtiany gallant a&s Were performed* and many were killed and wounded by the arrows. The (hips were grappled together with chains and hooks,, fo that they could not efcape. In the end, the viftoty remained with the Englifh j for the Flemings were difcomfited, and John Peteirfon, their captain, made prifonerz the reft were either taken or flain, for none efcaped. The Englifli made fail for England with their prizes and prifoners^ which prevented them from continuing their voyage to Brittany. The king was much rejoiced at die fuccefs of this engagement, and defeat of the Flemings, efpe-cially when he learnt that they were the aggreflbrs. John Peterfon and his captains were put into clofe confinement, and the others difperfed in va-rious parts of England. After this defeat off the ifle of Bas, the king of Çngland ordered a large armament to be prepared againft the Flemings, to engage the enemy where-ever they fhould meet with them, arid to blockade their ports, fo that no vefTel could fail from them without rifk of being taken. When the citizens of Bruges, Ypres, and Ghent, heard of thefe orders, they fummoned a council* and, after mature deliberation, refblved that it was not for their advantage to be at war or to haye any" ill-will with the Englifli, who were their neigh-bours and conne&ed with them by commerce, on account of any quarrel of their earl, nor would it be expedient for them to aid and fupport him* The principal towns, therefore, diflcmbled, but fent 142


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