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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 194



would have taken courage, and have held out until they (hould have been relieved : but, bcipg igno-rant of this, they opened a treaty with the confia-ble, to avoid further lofs. Sir Bertrand, who had had certain intelligence that • before evening he fhould fee .or hear of the Englifb, eagerly concluded thé négociation, granting them their lives : on which he made great rejoicings. He then ordered the army to march into the plain, and draw up in order of battle, faying to the chief commanders ; ' Gentlemen, look to your-felves, for the enemy is advancing, and I hope that we may have a battle before night/ Each made ready, upon hearing this, as well for the at-tack as to defend himfelf. [ The Englilh, however,wçre in no hurry to march further, when they learnt for certain that St. Severe was taken. We will, therefore, fpeak of what was palling in Poitiers. *At this time there were great diflentions in Poi-tiers, for three parts of the town wiflied to turn to the French ; but John Regnault, the mayor, and a part of the commonalty, wanted to remain with the Engliih. Notwithftanding this, the riçheft citizens and the churchmen, of whom there were there plenty, would, whatever might be the confe-rences, have the conftable fent for : indeed they fecredy advifecMiim to make hafte and take poffef-iion of the city, for on his approach they would open to him die gates. The conftable was much rejoiced, and told it to, the dukes of Berry and of Bourbon, who, deter-mined ill


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