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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 244



The conftable replied ; c Herald, you bring u$ agreeable news, and you are welcome. You will tçll your matters, that we are more defirous ta combat them than they are to meet us ; but that they muft march to the place where the treaty was firft entered into and agreed upon. You will in-* form them, that if they will advance to that place, they fhall infallibly have a battle/ The herald returned to his matters before Breft, and dçlivered his meflage ; they fent him back to the conftable, to whom he faid ; « My lord, I come again from my lords and matters, to whom I repeated the words you charged me with : they fay, that as they are only attached to the fea-fèr-vice they have not brought any horfes with them, and are not accuftomed to march op foot; for which reafon they inform you, that if you will fend them your horfes, they will come without delay to any place you fhall pleafe to appoint, and fight with you.* c My good friend,* anfwcred the conftable, c we will not, pleafç God, give fuch advantage to our enemies as we fhould do were we to fend them our horfes. It would alfo be confidered as an infult ; and, fhould we think of fuch a thing, it would be right we fhould have good and fuflfcient fecurity to anfwer for our horfes.' c In truth,' replied the herald, c they have not charged me to add ^ny thing on this head ; only, that if you do not accept their propofition* they fay you have not any caufe to detain their hoftages, find that in rçtMrning them you will aft but juftly.' 23*


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