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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 328



alarmed the inhabitants, who held a council to confider theif fituation, and whether they could maintain it. They addrcfled themfelves to their governor, for they found they could not long hold put, as no fuccour was to be expe&ed fincç their fénéfchal was taken, and with him the chivalry of Gafcony, on whofe afliftance they had depended. Sir Perducas told them, they wçre in fufficient ftrength to hold out for fome time, being well provided with provifions and artillery, if they made not any foolifh agreement. Things remained in this fituation until the next morning, when the trumpets of the army founded for an afiault, and every one repaired to his ban-ner. The conftable of France, who was in the field with a grand array, fent to hold a parley with the inhabitants before the afiault began, or any of their men were wounded or (lain j in which he re-monftrated with them, that having had their leaders made prifoner?, from whom alone they could hope for affiftance, aqd who were now in treaty to place themfelves and their lands under the obedience of the king of France, they could •not look for any relief j and, fhould the town be taken by ftorm, it would inevitably bç deftroyed by fire and flame, and none receive quarter. - Thefe threats frightened the inhabitants, who demanded time to hold a confultation, which was granted to them. The burghers then aflembled, without calling in their governor, and agreed tp furrender as good Frenchmen, provided they were peaceably and gendy dealt with, without aux of 315


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