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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 360



the fquire ' arrived ; and, as they knew he had brought fome intelligence, he was conduced to the earls of Douglas, Murray, Sutherland, and to fir Archibald Douglas, to whom he related all you have juft read. The Scots were much vexed on hearing the re-capture of Berwick caftle, but they were recon-ciled by the news of fir Thomas • Mufgrave and the other Englifh knights being quartered at Mel-rofe. . They determined to march inftandy, to diflodge their enemies, and make up from them for the lofs of Berwick. They armed themfelves, faddled their horfes, and leftHadingtoun, advancing to the right of Melrofc, for they were well acquainted with the country, and arrived a little before midnight. But it then began to rain very heavily, and with fuch a violent wind in their faces that there was none fo ftout but was overpowered by the ftorm, fo that they could fcarcely guide their horfes : the pages fuffered fo much from the cold, and their comfordefs fitua-tion, that they could not carry the fpears, but let them fall to the ground : they alfo feparated from their companions, and loft their way. The advanced guard had halted, by orders of the conftable, at the entrance of a large wood, through which it was neceflary for them to pafs ; for fome knights and fquires who had been long ufed to arms faid, they were advancing foolifhly, and that it Was not propcrto continue their courfc in fuch weather, and at fo late an hour, as they ran a rifle of lofing more than they could gain. They 348


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