Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 366



.354 After the defeat Qn the plains of St. Giles, which : I havejuft related, the fcouts met feveral of their fellow-foldiers flying like men difcomfited, who ?told them as much as they knew of the battle. Upon this, they returned, and with them the run-aways, who related truly what had paffed between 'the Englifh and Scots : they well knew they had beeji defeated, but were ignorant who had been killed or who made prifoner. The lords of Northumberland, on hearing this unfortunate intelligence, were, very melancholy,. and with reafon. They had two caufes Tor vexa-tion s for having, loft the battle, and for having miffed finding the Scots, whom they had, been in fearch of. m . \ • ' ' A numerous council, was affembled in the field, whether.or not to purfue the Scots: but as they clid not know which way they had marched, and night approaching, they refolved to make for Melrofe, and fix their quarters there. Before they could accomplifh their march to Melrofe, they heard the truth of the event of the battle ; that fir Thomas Mufgrave, his fon, with feven fcore men at arms, had been made prifoners by the Scots, who were carrying them off, and had taken the road to Edinburgh.' Theft barons then found that they muft fub-mit to their lofs, for help it they could not. They paffed the night as well as they were able, and on the morrow they decamped, when the earl of Northumberland gave permiflion for every one to return to his home : he himfelf retired into his own country. Thus was this expedition put an end to.. - . ' The


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика