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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.4
page 372



You muft know, ^ that the Romans wefc ex-ceedingly rejoiced at his arrival : the confuls and all the principal nobility of Rome went out to meet him on horfeback with great pomp, and con-ducted him with triumph into that city. He took up his refidencc in the yarican, and often vifited a church within Rome which he was much attached to, and to which he had made many confidence additions : it was called Santa if aria Maggiore. He died foon after his arrival in this fame church, in which he was buried, and there lies. His ob-r fêquies were performed in a magnificent manner, as was becoming fo eminent a perfonage. The cardinals, fhortly after the death of pope Gregory, aflcmblcd in conclave at the varican* As foon as they had met to cleft apope, accord-ing to the ufiial modes, whq might be worthy and of fcrvice to the church, die Romans collefted in great numbers, in the fuburbs of St. Peter : they were, including all forts, upwards of thirty thour land, encouraging each other to do mifchief, if things did not go according to their wifhes. They came frecjuendy before the conclave, and faid; € Liften to us, my lords cardinals : allow us to eleft a pope : you are too long about it. Chufe a Roman, for we will not have one of any other country : if you fhall eleft another, neither the Roman people nor the confuls will confidcr him as pope,* and you will run a ripe of being aQ put to fteath.1 The cardinals heard thefe words, and being in the power of the Romans, were not at their eafe, . . " nor 360


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