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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5
page 74



fis by fuch tattlers and jefters: of the parliament of Pa--" ris, and of the king's chamber, as you, that the king-dom is governed j and you manage the king as you pleafe, to do good or evil according to your wills : there is not a prince of the blood, however great he may be, if he incur your hatred, who will be liftened to : but fuch fellows fhall yet be hanged, until the gibbets be foil of them/ § The knight, who was ftill on his knees, was much mortified by thefe words : he faw that it was better for him to be filent than to make any reply : he did not therefore anfwer, but quitted the pre-fence of the earl and his lords,. when he found an opportunity. Some worthy people who were with the earl made way for him, and carried him to re-frefh himfelf. ' The knight afterwards mounted his horfe, • and returned to his hôtel in Sluys, where I will tell you what happened to • him. Although all his ftores were embarked, and there was a favourable wind for Scotland, he would not fail and rifk the dan-gers of the feâ} for he was warned that he was watphed' by the EngHfh who refided in Sluys, and that, if he fhould fail, he would be taken, and car-ried to England. Through fear of this happening, he gaVe up his intended voyage, quitted Sluys, and returned to the king at Paris. You,nay eafily imagine, that the lord de Bour-nezel was not long before he told the king all that had befallen him in Flanders : he related every thing exactly as it had happened. It was neceflary he fhould do fo by way of excufing himfelf for not having


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