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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5
page 80



When the' duke had ftaid at Calais five days, ^ " ing a favourable wind, he embarked with the carl of Salisbury, and landed at pbver, and from ihence went to.the young king Richard, who re-ceived them with much joy ; as did alfo the duke of Lancafter, the earls of Cambridge and Buck-ingham, and the great baons of England. You have before heard how fir Valeran de Lux-embourg, the young count de St. Pol, had been made prifoner in a battle between Ardres and Calais, and had been carried to England under the king's pleafure, who had purchafed him of the lord de Gommegines : for the lord de Gommegines had fet on foot this expedition, in which the count had been made a prifoner by a fquire, a good man at arms, from the country of Gueldres. The young count de St. Pol remained long time a prifoner in England, without being ran-fomed : true it is, that the king of England, du-ring the life-time of the captai de Buch, offered Ijim feveral times to the king of France and to his allies in exchange for the captai $ but neither the king of France nor his council would liften to it, nor give up the captai in exchange, to the great diflatisfaftion of the king of England. Things remained for fome time in this fituation. The count de St. Pol had an agreeable prifon in the beautiful caftle of Windfor, and was allowed the liberty of amufing himfelf with hawking wherever he pleafed in the environs of Weft-minfter and Windfbr : he was thus trufted on the faith of his word. F 3 ' " ""The 69


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