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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.5
page 96



.flat country thereabouts. The Romans difmantled the caftle of St. Angclo, and burnt the village of St. Peter. When fir Silvefter Budes who was ftill in that country heard that his people had loft the village of St. Peter and the caftle of St. Angelo, he was much vexed, and thought how he could revenge himfeif on the Romans. He learnt from his fpies, that the principal perfons from the city were to meet in council at the capitol ; ' upon * which he planned an enterprize of men at arms, whom he had retained near him, and rode that day through bye roads to Rome, which he entered by the gate leading to Naples. On his arrival, he made direct-ly for the capitol, and came there fo opportunely that the council had juft left their hall, and were in the fquare. Thefe Bretons, couching their fpears and fpurring their horfes, charged the Romans full gallop, and flew and wounded numbers " of the principal perfons of the city. Among thofe that lay dead in the fquare were feven banners and two hundred other rich men : a great many more were wounded. When the Bretons had performed this exploit they retreated, as it was evening : they were not purfued, on account of the night, and becaufe the Romans were fo frightened that they could only attend on their friends. They paffed the night in great anguifli of heart, burying the dead, and tak-ing care of the wounded. The next morning, they bethought themfelves of an *a& of cruelty, which they put into execution : G 3 they S5


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