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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 120



earl : fome faid, he had left the town on Saturday night : others that.he was yet in Bruges, but fo clofely hid that he could hot be found. The captains of the Ghent army paid no great atten-tion to him; for they were fo rejoiced at their victory that they thought nothing of any earl, baron or knight in Flanders, and looked on themfelves as fo mighty that all the world muft obey them. Philip von Artaveld and Peter du Bois confi-dered, that when they had quitted Ghent they had left it deftitute of all provifion, for there was neither corn nor wine in the town: they inftant-ly detached a large party to Damme and Sluys to gain thofe towns, and the provifions which were in them, in order to fupply their fellow-citizens in Ghent. On the detachment arriving at Damme, the gates were thrown open, and the town with all in it furrendered. They ordered out of the fine cellars the wines of Poitou, Gafcony, and la Rochelle, and from other diftant countries, to the amount of fix thoufand tuns, which they load-ed On carriages and fent by land to Ghent, and alfo -by boats on the river Lis. They then marched on to Sluys, which initant-ly fubmitted to them and opened its gates. They found there great quantities of casks of corn and flour, in ships and in the ftorehoufes of foreign merchants* and having paid for the whole, fent it by land and water to Ghent. Thus was Ghen delivered from famine, through the mercy of God. It could not have happened otherwife, and well ought the Ghent men to remember it; 106


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