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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 148



Senlis, where the king was, to whom and tç his uncles he gave the letters. The king took them, and had them read in the prefence of his uncles and council. After they had been read and comprehended, the auditors burft out into laughter. The meflfen-ger, becaufe he had come into the king's pre* fence without a paffport, was ordered to bè arretted and put into prifon, where he remain^ ed for upwards of three weeks. , When Philip heard of this, he was very in* dignànt, and, having fummoned the captains of the army to him, he faid,—'You fee what hot •nour the king of France pays to us, after we have fo amicably written to him, for which he detains our meflçnger. We certainly make too many difficulties in connecting ourfelves with the Englifh, and, may fuffer for it. The duke of Burgundy is npw in France and governs thp king juft as he pleafes, for he is but a child. Do you think that he will leave things in their prefent fituation ? Certainly not. Take for example our meffenger, whom he has detained. It will therefore be prudent in us to fend té England, as well for the general good of Flan* ders as to fecure ourfelves and alarm our ene* mies. I am defirous,' faid Philip, tthat we fend thither ten or twelve of our principle men, that the knowledge of it may be carried to France, and that the king and his council may think we intend to unite ourfelves with his ad-verfary the king of England. But I do not '134


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