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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 176



m When the.Haife, fir John Jument, the emd fiable de Vuillon, fir Henry Duffle, and the other knights and fquires, had • fufficiently alarmed the country, they tliought it was time for them to retreat, and fet out on their return, intending to repafe, the bridge, but they found it ftrongiy occupied by Flemings, who were bu-lily employed in deftroying it ; and, when they had broken down any parts, they covered ihem with ftraw, that the mifchief might not be per* ceived. ' . The knights and fquires at this moment ar-rived, mounted on the beft of horfes, and found Upwards of two thousand peasants drawn up n a body without the town, prepared to advance upon them. The gentlemen, on feeing thi** formed, and having fixed their lances on their refis, thofe beft mounted inftantly charged this body of peafants, with loud fhouts. The Flem-ings opened their, ranks through fear, but others fay through malice; for they well knew the bridge would not bear them ; and they faid among themfelves, ' Let us make way for them, and we fhall foon fee fine fport.' The Hafe de Flandres, and his companions, defirous to get away, for any further ftay would be againft them, galloped for the bridge, which was now too weak to bear any great weight ; however the Hafe, and fome others, had the courage and good luck to pafs over: they might' be about thirty : but, *s others were fol-lowing, the bridge broke down tinder them. •Horfes and riders were overthrown, and both perifhed together. • - Thofe


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