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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 193



would not refufehim; and intelligence was fent to the conftable, that his coufin the lord de Rieux had crofTed. The conftable mufed a little, and then faid ; f Make the crofs-bows (hoot, and fkir-mifli with the Flemings who are on the other fide of the bridge, to occupy their attention, and prevent them from obferving our people ; for, if theyfliould have any notion what they are about, they will fall upon them, deftroy the paflage, and kill all thofe who have crossed : and I would much rather die than that fhould happen.' Upon this, the crofs-bows and infantry ad-vanced. There were among them fome who flung hand-grenades,* which burfting, caft out bolts of iron beyond the bridge, even as far as, the town of Commines. The skirmifh now began to be very fharp, and the van-guard, by their move-ments, feemed determined to crofs the bridge if they could. The Flemings, being fhielded up to their nofes, made a good appearance, and de-fended thémfelvefc well. Thus passed this day, which was a Monday, in skirmifiling; and it was foon dark, for at that feafon the days are very fhort. The boats, however, Continued to carry over men at arms in great numbers, who on their landing, hid themfelves in the alder woodt waiting for more. You may eafily guefs what perils they were in; for, had thofe in Commines gained the leaft * I call bombardes hand-grenades : to my mind, it ex* {tains this paffage more eafily. LordBerners totally omits it; N a intelligence 179


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