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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 196



paffable ford over the lis between this and Courtray/ c What fhall we do ?' faid fome of them to Pe-ter du Bois: ' shall we offer them battle?' € By no means/ replied Peter : * let them advance : but we will remain in our flrength and in our place ; we are on high ground, and they on low, fo that we have great advantage over them 5 and, if we defcend to meet them in the plain, we shall lofe it. Let us wait until the night become more obfcure, and then we will confider how we had beft actf They are not of force fuffici-ent to withftand us in battle ; and befides, we are acquainted with all the roads of the country of which they muft be ignorant/. This advice was followed 5 for the Flemings never bodged from their poft, but remained fteady at the foot of the bridge, drawn up in order of battle on the caufeway, in filence, and, by their appearance feemed as if they had not no-ticed what was paffing. Thofe who had croffed the river continued advancing flowly through the marshes, following the courfe of it as they approached Cpmmines. The conftable of France, on the oppofite fide of the water, faw his men at arms, with banners and pennons fluttering in the wind, drawn up in a bandfome fmall battalion, and marching toward Commines. On feeing this, his blood began to run cold from the great dread he Ipd of their being defeated ; for he knew the Flem-ings were in great force çn that fide of the water. 182 v


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