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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 226



he wanted to fend them to the part whence the noife had come, to find out what it could be; but they reported that that had already been done, and that there was no caufe found for it/ Philip was much aftonifhed ; and they were greatly1 blamed, that having heard a noife to-wards tHe enemy's quarters, they had remained quiet. Ha,' faid they to, Philip, -c in truth' we did hear a noife towards the Mont d'Or, and we fent to know what it could be $ but thofe who had been ordered thither, reported that there was nothing to be found or feen. Not having feen any pofitive appearance of a movement of the enemy, we »were univilling to alarm the army left we fhould be blamed for it.' This fpeech of the guard fomewhat appeafed Philip ; but in his own mind he marvelled much what it could be. Some faid it was the devils of hell running and dancing about the place where the battle was to be, for the abundance of prey they expected. * * " ' Neither Philip von Artaveld nor the Flem-ings were quite at their eafe after this alarm* They were fufpicious of having Jbeen betrayed and furprifed. They armed themfelves leifure; ly with whatever they had, made large fires in their quarters, and breakfafted comfortably, for they had victuals in abundance. • About an hour before day, Philip faid; 'I think it right that we march into the plain aod draw up our men ; becaufe fhould the Frehch advance to attack' us, ' we ought not: to be un-preparedy nor in diforder, but propetly drawn »12


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