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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 240



Mê 'Philips page fhwthe illfuccefs of his country-men, being well mounted on his courfer, he fet off, and left his matter, for he could not give him any affîftance, and returned towards Courtray, on his way to Gheht. When the Flemings found themfelves inclofed on two fides, there was an end to the • bufinefs, for they could not affift each other. The king's battalion, which had been fomewhat difordered at the beginning, now recovered. . • The men at arms knocked down the Flemings with all their might. They had well fliarpened battle-axes, with which they cut through hel-mets and difbrainçd heads : others gave fuch blows with leaden maces that nothing could withftand them, Scarcely were the Flemings overthrown before the pillagers advanced, who, mixing with the men at arms, made ufe of the large knives they carried, and finifhed flaying whoever fell into their hands, without more mercy than if they had been fo many dogs. The clattering on the helmets, by the axes and leaden maces, was fo loud, that nothing elfe could be heard for the noife. I was told that if all the armourers of Paris and Bruxelles had been there working at their trade, they could not have made a greater noife than thefe com-batants did on the helmets of their enemies; for they ftruck with all their force, and fet to their work with the greateft good will. • Some, • indeed, prefied too forward into the crowd, and were furrounded and flain: in par-ticular fir Louis de Goufalz, a knight from Berry, and fir Fleton de Réniel. There were feveral • more,


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