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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 296



im begah brifkly ; for, to fay the truth, the Flemings defended themfelves Very well, but the archers wounded or beat down many, when the men at arms broke through them, and with their pointed fpears killed multitudes oil their firft charge. In short, the English won the day, and the Flemings were defeated. They thought to keep together m a body and enter Dunkirk; but the English fol-lowed them elofely and kept up the engagement fo warmly that they .entered the town with them. Numbers were flain in the ftreets or on the shore, though they there gamed fome advantage, for the English loft four hundred at leaft. As the English purfued, the Flemings retired: many detached parties fought, in which feveral knights and fquires from Flanders were flain; fcarcely any eicaped death or captivity. Thus did this affair end: there were full nine thoufand Flemings killed at this battle of Dunkirk. The day this battle had taken place, fir John Villain and fir John du Moulin had returned to the earl of Flanders at Lille, and had repeated to the earl all they had feen and heard from the English. The earl was very melancholy on the fubject, not knowing how to act : he was ftill more fo, and with greater reafon, when he heard the news of the flaughtfer and defeat of his men at Dunkirk. He bore it with tolerable patience, and com-forted himfelf as well as he could, by faying,— •* Well, if we have loft this time, at another, pleafe God, wesbalhyio.-' He inftantlyjdifpatched , • , a mef-


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