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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 322



Upon this, he made very prudent regulations! cm dividing his men under pennons and into companies, to mount the walls and guard the gates, he found he had numbers fufficient. He ordered all the ladies and women* children and • lower clafles of inhabitants to retire into a ctyurch* whence they were not to ftir. The king of France was at the abbey of Ra^ nomkergues, and learnt that the English had re-treated to Bergues. Â council was held on the occafion, when it was ordered that the van, with the conftable and marshals, should advance be-yond the town and encamp on one of its fides ; and the king of France, with the dukes of Berry, Burgundy and Bourbon would follow with the main army -3 that the count de Bloi$ and the • count d'Eu, with the rear divifion, should lodge themfelves on the other fide of the town, and thus furround the English. This plan was executed ; and the king fet out from Ranombergues, attended by his whole army. It was a beautiful fight to behold thefé banners* pennons and helmets glittering in the fun, and-fuch numbers of men at arms that the eye could not compafs them: they feemed like a moving foreft, fo upright did they hold their lances/ Thus they marched in four divifions towards Bergues, to inclofe the English in that town. About eight o'clock in the morning, an English • herald entered the town, who* by the courtefyof the lords of France, had paffed through their army ; he waited on fir Hugh Calverley in his hotel. .308"


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