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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 331



4hat one of the night-guard going his rounds heard her, and afked who flie wafe, fhe faid fhe was a poor woman who had come to tell them that a body of Ghent men were clofe at hand ; and that fhe had feen them carrying many lad* ders to furprife Oudenarde; but now fhe had given Jhis' information fhe muft get away, for fhould they meet her fhe would be a dead woman. The poor woman departed, and the watch re-mained perfectly aftoniihed. He determined t# keep quiet where he was, to fee if this Woman had told truth. The Ghent men, without horn or trumpet, were filently advancing to begin their , enterprife : they made not any noife except by talking. Francis Atremèû fent forward four of hie inen, ordering them to reconnoitre without mak-• ing the leaft noife by coughing 6r otherwife, and report to him, fhould they obferve any thing. • • They obeyed their orders, apd Francis Atre-men remained hid in the marfhes with his men, very near this poor woman, who heard and fa\t them diftinctly J but they did not notice her. - Thé four men advancing up to the ditches, neither faw nor heard any thing. It was very unlucky; for, if they had but feen a lighted candle, they would have thought there had been a good watch • kept. They returned to Francis telling him they had not feen any thing, nor heard the leaft noife; c I believe the watch has gone his rounds/ faid Francis, ' and is now retired to bed: come, let at take this upper road which leads to the gates; and «nter the ditches.' The good woman heard theft . words; 3tf


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