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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 344



preparations for "their departure. On the Wed-nefday morning they loaded their baggage-horfes and began their march, ' pafling through the army with paffports from the king. The Bre-ton were much èxafperated when they faw them fo loaded ; and they treated very indifferently afew who tarried behind. Thus the Englifh marched to Gravelities, where they halted. On the Thurf-day morning, when they left it, they fet fire to the place, burnt it to the ground, and arrived at Calais with all their pillage. They flopped there to refrefh themfelves, and to wait for a favourable wind to return to England. • The king of France, ' and all the lords of his army with their attendants, entered Bourbourg on the Thurfday morning, when the Bretons began to plunder-it, without excepting even the church of St. John: in which church, a pillager having mounted on an altar, with the intent of forcing out a precious ftone that was in the crown of an image made to reprefent the perfon of our Lady, the image turned about, and the pillager in his fright fell from the altar and was inffeotly ftruck dead. This is a certain truth, for mmj perfons were witneffes of it. Shortly afterwards, another pillager came with a fimilar intent of robbing the image; but all the bells began a peal without any one touching them, fbr no ope could have rung them, the bell-ropes being drawn up and fattened. • On account of tfyefe miracles, the church «as vifited by crowds. The king made a hasadfoine prefent 330


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