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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.6
page 400



remained in garrifon in the town of Ardem-bourg, with fir Rafflart de Flandres, fir John de Jumont, fir Henry du Coing, the lord de Mon-tigny in Oftrevant, the lord de Longueval, fir John de Bernecte, fir Peter de Bailleul, Belles Fourrière, Phelippot Ganey, Raoullin de la Folie, and feveral more, to the amount of two hundred combatants. They determined among them-felves to make an excurfion into the Quatre Mefliers and ravage that country, for much pro-vifion was carried from thence into Ghent. They therefore, having fixed on a day for this enter-prife. armed themfelves and marched thither. The fame day that the French had fixed on for their expedition^ about two thoufand deter-mined men had fallied out of Ghent under the command of Francis ' Atremen : accidentally they found themfelves in a village in the midft of the French. When they had reoonnoitred each other, they faw a battle was unavoidable. The French inftantly difmounted, and, grafping* their lances, advanced on the enemy: the Ghent men, who were as numerous, did the fame. The combat began fharply; but the Ghent men advanced into a pafs which was much to their lofs/ where the battle was more fevere : many gallant deeds were done, and many beat down. Sir Rafflart de Flandres in that place Ihewed the greateft courage ; and the knights and fquires engaged the Ghent men with deter-mined valour, as indeed it behoved them to do; for quarter was given to none. ' ' At lai the Ghent men, by having fuperior numbers 386


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