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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 23



: They continued their voyage until they arrived at Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, where the. king chiefly refides when he is in that part of the . country. The earls of Douglas and Moray, from, * the information they had received, were waiting, for them in Edinburgh : and as foon as they wçre come, haftened to meet them at the harbour, aiid . ' rpceived them, molt amicably, bidding them wel-come to their country., .. The Scots barons inftantly recognifed fir Geof-fry de Charny, for he had refided full two months, with them laft summer in Scotland. Sir Geoffry njade them acquainted, as he very well knew how, with the admiral and the barons of France... At tji^t titne the king was not at Edinburgh, but in the highlands of Scotland : his fons received them handfomely, telling them the king would fliortly be there. . They were fatisfied with this information, and the lords and their men lodged themfelves as well as they could in Edinburgh, and thofe who could not lodge there were quartered in the different vil-lages thereabout. Edinburgh, notwithftdnding it is the refidence of the king, and is the Paris of Scotland, is not such a town as Tournay or Va-lenciennes ; for there are not in the whole town four thoufand houfes. Several of the French lords were therefore obliged to take up their lodgings in the neighbouring villages, and at Dunfermline, Kelfon*, Dunbar, Dalkeith, and in other villages. * Kelson. Q. Kelso lrould have been too far distant. News 1#


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